Retailer Commitments

Retailer commitments on pesticides and pollinator health

Retailer Commitments

When Friends of the Earth and allies launched a campaign to get pollinator-toxic pesticides out of plants labeled as “bee-friendly” at home and garden stores, more than 140 companies responded by eliminating neonicotinoid pesticides in their supply chains. That includes the two largest garden stores in the world, Home Depot and Lowe’s. Links to their policies are below. Thank you to the over half million people who made their voices heard by signing petitions, delivering letters, making phone calls and showing up in person at the retailers to demand change. 

Now, we need grocery stores to take action. Our Bee-Friendly Retailer Campaign is calling on grocery stores to commit to end the routine and unnecessary use of pesticides that are toxic to pollinators and people in their supply chains and to offer more organic food, which is better for pollinators, people and the planet. 

Since we started this effort in 2017, some of the largest grocery retailers in the U.S. have created pollinator health policies. Check out their policies below!

While these policies are good steps in the right direction, the scale of the pollinator crisis requires that these and other food retailers join a race to the top by making time-bound commitments to phase out toxic pesticides and support a transition to bee-friendly organic and ecological agriculture.

Some of our top hits:

Bee-Friendly Food Retailer Commitments

RetailerNumber of locations in the USCommitment
Albertsons2,277Supplier Sustainability Guidelines & Expectations

In February 2020, Albertsons revised the company Supplier Sustainability Guidelines & Expectations for own brand suppliers (see pages 10 – 11) to include pollinator health policy language. The guidance identifies the following pesticides as targets for reduction: neonicotinoids, chlorpyrifos, and pesticides on the California Prop 65 list of chemicals that can cause cancer, birth defects or other reproductive harm, which includes glyphosate. The guidance encourages use of alternative approaches, including integrated pest management. The guidance also encourages suppliers to avoid regrettable substitution (the replacement of one hazardous pesticide with another) and includes a link to a list of regrettable substitutes. 

Albertsons’ guidance on pollinator health does not include any timebound or measurable commitments to phase out pesticides of concern in company supply chains.

Aldi2,070Pollinator Policy

In October 2019, Aldi released a pollinator health policy for produce, live plant and flower suppliers. The policy encourages suppliers to transition away from neonicotinoid and chlorpyrifos pesticides toward alternative approaches that limit non-essential use of pesticides whenever possible, including Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategies. The policy states that suppliers should avoid regrettable substitutes (the replacement of one hazardous pesticide with another). The policy also states that Aldi supports and encourages the growth of the organic industry as demonstrated by the company’s expanded offerings.

Aldi’s policy does not include any time bound or measurable commitments to phase out pesticides of concern in its supply chains.

Costco559Policy to Protect Pollinator Health

In May 2018, Costco released a pollinator health policy that encourages suppliers of fruits, vegetables, and live goods/plants to phase out use of neonicotinoid and chlorpyrifos pesticides. The policy encourages use of least-toxic approaches stating, “We support the use of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategies and other creative solutions for the use of least toxic alternatives,” and encourage suppliers to “limit the use of all non-essential chemicals and to utilize eco-friendly methods of pest or disease control.” The policy also encourages suppliers to avoid regrettable substitution (the replacement of one hazardous pesticide with another), and it provides a list of potential regrettable substitutes. Costco’s pollinator health policy also states that the company supports and encourages the growth of the organic industry. 

Costco’s pollinator health policy does not include any time bound or measurable commitments to phase out pesticides of concern in company supply chains.

CVS9,960

Pollinator Protection Policy

In April 2022, CVS established a pollinator health policy encouraging suppliers of store brand goods to avoid use of neonicotinoids, organophosphates and glyphosate. The company recognizes that not only do these pesticides harm pollinators, they pose significant health hazards for agricultural workers and the communities surrounding agricultural lands. The policy also links to a list of regrettable substitutes to avoid. The policy encourages suppliers to adopt least-toxic approaches to pest management, including Integrated Pest Management (IPM), and it recognizes organic agriculture as a method to reduce pesticide use.  CVS also states that the company will offer trainings for supply chain partners on sustainable approaches to pesticide management in alignment with its policy.

Dollar Tree15,685

Pollinator Protection Policy

In July 2020, Dollar Tree released a pollinator health policy that requires flower suppliers to eliminate nitroguanidine neonicotinoids and glyphosate by 2024. The company will also track and annually assess pesticide use and associated environmental risks in flower supply chains starting in 2022. In addition, the policy encourages food and beverage suppliers to phase out pesticides of high concern — including nitroguanidine neonicotinoids, glyphosate, and chlorpyrifos — and to shift to least toxic approaches including Integrated Pest Management (IPM). The company will educate suppliers on sustainable agriculture strategies, the harmful impacts of select pesticides, and will provide strategies and resources to avoid the use of regrettable substitutions. The policy links to the EPA list of acutely pollinator-toxic pesticides and to the UC Davis Bee Precaution tool for a list of regrettable substitutes.

Giant Eagle474

Commitment to Protect Pollinators

In September, 2020, Giant Eagle released a pollinator health policy for produce and live plant suppliers which was expanded in August, 2021. The policy requires produce suppliers to eliminate use of nitroguanidine neonicotinoids by 2025 and to avoid a list of regrettable substitutions which are hyperlinked in the policy. The policy also requires all national and global produce suppliers to adopt a comprehensive Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program by 2025. To achieve this, Giant Eagle asks growers to get certified to one of a list of vetted third party certifications with meaningful IPM criteria. Those not able to get certified are required to create an IPM plan that meets key, stringent criteria and which will be reviewed by an external entity with expertise in IPM. The policy also states Giant Eagle’s commitment to expand organic offerings. In addition, Giant Eagle states that all live plants sold at the store are grown without neonicotinoids and that the company no longer sells products for home garden use that contain neonicotinoids or glyphosate.

Kroger2,742Pollinator Protection Statement

In June 2019, Kroger updated its Pollinator Protection Statement beyond live outdoor plants to encourage all suppliers to limit use of neonicotinoid insecticides and to move away from pesticides in favor of alternative pest management. The policy states that Kroger will continue to increase the number and variety of organic products it offers. 

Meijer253

Commitment to Pollinator Health

In August 2020, Meijer established a pollinator health policy encouraging fresh produce, floral, and live plant suppliers to minimize use of pesticides of high concern including nitroguanidine neonicotinoids and organophosphates and to avoid regrettable substitutes. The policy encourages these suppliers to use Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and regenerative agriculture approaches and to use chemical controls as a last resort. Meijer states that the company will track supplier use of IPM including whether growers achieve third party certifications and will work with academic institutions to establish educational opportunities to support growers. Meijer’s policy also states a goal to grow USDA organic sales at twice the rate of non-organic produce and to onboard new organic suppliers. The company will also educate consumers about pollinator health through in-store signage, and Meijer Garden Centers will offer pollinator-friendly live goods and products to encourage at-home pollinator habitats.

Rite Aid2,510Pollinator Health Policy

In December 2019, Rite Aid released a pollinator health policy for all suppliers that identifies neonicotinoids, glyphosate, and chlorpyrifos and other organophosphate pesticides as targets for reduction. The policy also includes a link to a comprehensive list of pesticides identified as acutely toxic to pollinators. The policy encourages transition to least-toxic approaches, stating: “We encourage all of our food and beverage suppliers to reduce use of pollinator-toxic pesticides and to adopt least-toxic approaches to pest management, including biological and physical pest control and Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategies,” defining IPM as a strategy that “utilizes non-chemical, mechanical and biological methods of pest control, acts against pests only when necessary and uses least-toxic methods as a last resort. IPM relies on inspection and monitoring to detect and correct conditions that could lead to pest problems.” The policy encourages suppliers to avoid regrettable substitution (the replacement of one hazardous pesticide with another) and includes a list of possible regrettable substitutes. Rite Aid’s pollinator health policy also includes a commitment to continue expanding organic offerings. 

Rite Aid’s pollinator health policy does not include any time bound or measurable commitments to phase out pesticides of concern in company supply chains.

Southeastern Grocers423Pollinator Health Commitment
 
In August 2022, Southeastern Grocers released a Pollinator Health Commitment for fresh produce and floral suppliers. The commitment states that the company will work with suppliers to grow products without the use of neonicotinoids, glyphosate and organophosphates and avoid replacing them with a list of other pesticides identified as harmful to pollinators. The company also commits to make all reasonable efforts to source fresh produce and floral from suppliers with vetted third-party certifications that include criteria for integrated pest management. The policy also recognizes organic agriculture as a solution for pollinator health and states that the company will work to increase the amount of USDA organic produce offered in stores. Finally, Southeastern Grocers will support the expansion of pollinator habitats.
Target1,897

Pollinator Health Policy

In July 2020, Target established a policy encouraging all produce, live plant and flower suppliers to transition away from neonicotinoids and chlorpyrifos and to avoid regrettable substitutions. The policy also encourages these suppliers to employ Integrated Pest Management (IPM) strategies. Live plant suppliers are encouraged to label pollinator-friendly plants grown without neonicotinoids, flupyradifurone and sulfoxaflor. In addition, Target committed to track vendor use of pesticides on store properties to understand where neonicotinoids are being used and to develop safer pest management practices.

Walmart

5,342

Pollinator Health Position

In April 2021, Walmart released a pollinator health policy which requires 100% of fresh produce and floral suppliers to adopt ecological farming methods called integrated pest management (IPM), as verified by a vetted list of third-party certifications, by 2025. The policy also encourages produce suppliers to phase out pollinator-toxic pesticides — chlorpyrifos and nitroguanidine neonicotinoids and to avoid replacing them with a list of other pesticides identified as acutely toxic to pollinators, which is provided in the policy. The policy asks suppliers to annually track and report pesticide application and biodiversity management to assess progress. Walmart’s policy also includes an encouragement to fresh produce suppliers to protect, restore, or establish pollinator habitats by 2025 on at least 3% of land they own, operate or invest in.

Home & Garden Retailer commitments

RetailerNumber and location of storesPolicy statement
Ace Hardware Corporation5,000+ locationsHas removed neonics from 95 percent of its insecticide product offerings. All of its private label lawn and garden products are neonic-free. Policy statement here.
American Meadows1 location, VermontCommitted to have a 100% neonicotinoid-free supply chain by the end of 2016. Identify products that are not neonicotinoid-free on the website and inform consumers about the harms of neonicotinoids.

Policy statement here.

American Native Plants1 location, MarylandGrow and provide native plants without the use of neonicotinoids in any production practices.

Policy statement here.

Bachman’s21 locations, MinnesotaEliminated the use of neonicotinoids for their own nursery stock and outdoor plants. Removed products containing neonicotinoids from their store shelves and provide recommendations for alternatives to customers. The store is contacting its garden plant suppliers as well, to encourage them to discontinue the use of neonicotinoids. Moving forward, Bachman’s is focusing on raising awareness about pollinator preservation, providing education and training about plant issues, expanding pollinator natural habitat on their property and encouraging others to do the same.

Policy statement here.

The Backyard Greenhouse1 location, MinnesotaDoesn’t use neonicotinoids in production.

Policy statement here.

Bailey Nurseries Co.1 location, MinnesotaEliminated all foliar treatments with the three named neonicotinoid insecticides—Dinoteduran, Imidacloprid and Thiamethoxam—from container and bareroot fields.

Policy statement here.

The Behnke Nurseries Co.3 locations, MarylandPledges to: 1) Never apply neonicotinoid pesticides to plants on the Behnke property, either in ground or in pots; 2) Recommend use of least-toxic effective remedies; and 3) discontinue sales of all neonicotinoid-containing products.

Policy statement here.

Berkeley Horticultural Nursery1 location, CaliforniaEliminated neonicotinoids from the store. All of its California Certified Organic plants are neonic-free, including any plants from its vegetable and herb tables. It does not sell any treatments that contain neonicotinoids, although other plants may contain these chemicals.

Policy statement here.

BJ’s Wholesale Club200+ locations, 15 statesRequires all vendors to disclose the use of any neonicotinoids in nursery or plant-able products (i.e. blueberry bushes, tulip bulbs).

Requires any vendors using neonicotinoids in nursery or bedding plants to submit plan/process used to protect bees when using neonicotinoids (i.e. timing, segregation, etc.)

Asks all vendors to be out of neoticotinoid plants by the end of this year and/or will include a label that states “treated with neonicotinoids, use caution around pollinators.”

Policy statement here.

Black Lake Organic Garden Store1 location, WashingtonGrowing organically since before the word “organic” came into vogue.

Policy statement here.

Blooming Junction1 location, OregonHas suspended use of neonicotinoids on plants indefinitely.

Policy statement here.

Blooms Wholesale Nursery1 location, CaliforniaDoes not spray neonicotinoids.

Policy statement here.

Buchanan’s Native Plants1 location, TexasUses organic plants and gardening supplies.

Policy statement here.

Costco727 locations Encourages suppliers of garden plants to limit the use of non-essential chemicals, discourages use of neonicotinoid insecticides on pollinator-attractive plants and encourages use of eco-friendly methods of pest and disease control. Also expanding its selection of organic products, which supports pollinator health.

Policy statement here.

Ecoscape Environmental Design, LLC1 location, ColoradoDoes not use neonicotinoids in any of its garden practices and has pledged to never use them.

Policy statement coming soon.

Garden Fever!1 location, OregonDoes not carry plant care products containing neonicotinoids, and labels neonicotinoid-free plants.

Policy statement here.

Gerten’s2 locations, MinnesotaDoes not use neonicotinoids on any bedding plants or on seeds for plants the store grows. The store does apply neonicotinoids to larger plants and hanging baskets and does not guarantee that starter plugs or cutters being supplied from other locations have not been pre-treated with neonicotinoids.

Policy statement here.

Harlequin’s1 location, ColoradoWill never use neonicotinoids on plants or sell any neonic pesticides in any form. Will make every effort to buy plants from wholesalers who do not use neonics.

Policy statement here.

Herb Farmacy1 location, MassachusettsCommitted to growing organically from the start because it is the best way to ensure healthy plants, nutritious food, and sustainable environment.

Policy statement here.

High Country GardensOnlineLabels neonicotinoid-free products and educates customers on their dangers. High Country Gardens will have a fully neonicotinoid-free supply chain by the end of 2016.

Policy statement here.

Home Depot2,200+ locationsHas removed neonicotinoid pesticides from 80 percent of its flowering plants and will complete its phase-out in plants by 2018.

Policy statement here.

Kent’s Plants and Wild Bird Store1 location,
Wisconsin
Their plants are raised in a soil-mix that uses environmentally-friendly, sustainably-sourced ingredients (it’s even probiotic for healthier roots), and they are all 100% chemical-free. They have never used neonicotinoids and never will, and they only buy from suppliers who don’t use them, either. This means 100% bird-and-bee-friendliness with their plants.

Policy statement here.

Kroger3,666 locations across the U.S.Committed to phase out neonicotinoids on live garden plants in its stores and garden centers by 2020.

Policy statement here.

Lowe’s Home Improvement1,840 locations across the U.S.Pledged to eliminate neonicotinoid pesticides from its stores as suitable alternatives become available, redouble existing integrated pest management practices for suppliers and provide additional material educating customers about pollinator health.

Policy statement here.

Meadows Farms Nurseries & Landscape19 locations, MarylandDoes not apply neonicotinoids in garden centers.

Policy statement here.

Painters Greenhouse1 location, North CarolinaOnly uses neonics as a last resort treatment on plants.

Policy statement here.

Patty’s Plants Natural & Organic Garden Supply1 location, WisconsinOrganic gardening store.

Policy statement here.

Produce Denver1 location, ColoradoOnly uses organic methods for pest control and tries their best to not buy treated plants, as they are an edible landscaping company.

Policy statement here.

Simply Native Nursery1 location, IllinoisNo neonicotinoids have ever been used on nursery plants.

Policy statement here.

Timberline Gardens, Inc.1 location, ColoradoDoes not use neonicotinoids in any of its garden practices and has pledged to never use them.

Policy statement here.

Toadshare Wildflower Farm1 location, New JerseyIf need to intervene, use organic methods as much as possible. Does not, and never has, used any neonicotinoid pesticides.

Policy statement here.

True Value4,000 locationsWill phase out the sale of products that contain neonicotinoid pesticides by spring of 2018. Collaborating with grower partners to encourage the removal of neonicotinoids from garden plants.

Policy statement here.

Upstarts Organic Seedlings1 location, CaliforniaTheir seedlings are organically grown without the use of chemical fertilizers or pesticides.

Policy statement here.

Urban Farm Company of Colorado1 location, ColoradoWill never use neonicotinoids on plants and will make every effort to buy plants from wholesalers who do not use neonicotinoids.

Policy statement here.

Valley View Farms2 locations, MarylandPulled the items that contain neonicotinoids from shelves.

Policy statement here.

Volante Farm Greenhouses1 location, MassachusettsPractices Integrated Pest Management.

Policy statement here.

WildThings Rescue Nursery1 location, New YorkNever have to worry about pesticides harming the birds, butterflies, bees, and native pollinators in gardens..

Policy statement here.

Nursery commitments

NurseryNumber & location of nurseriesPolicy statement
Amanda’s Garden1 location,
New York
Propagates and grows native perennial plants. Amanda’s Garden does not use neonicotinoid pesticides, and ensure that other nurseries from which it buys plants do not either.

Policy statement here.

Annie’s Annuals1 location, CaliforniaAdopted a “bee friendly” program and doesn’t use any neonicotinoids associated with colony collapse disorder.

Policy statement here.

Arrowhead Alpines1 location, MichiganArrowhead Alpines is an insecticide-free operation.

Policy statement here.

Blooming Nursery1 location, OregonHas suspended use of neonicotinoids on plants indefinitely.

Policy statement here.

Blue Moon Nursery1 location, CaliforniaUses organic practices.

Policy statement here.

Bluestone Perennials, Inc.1 location, OhioHave not used any products containing neonicotinoids since 2012.

Policy statement here.

Brushwood Nursery1 location, GeorgiaOnly uses biocontrols and OMRI listed organic, non-persistent pesticides.

Policy statement here.

Burnt Meadow Nursery1 location, MaineFollows an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) approach and, whenever possible, uses biological controls before applying pesticides. Any pesticides or fungicides used are OMRI organic.

Policy statement here.

Cavano’s Perennials Inc.2 locations, MarylandDiscontinued use of all neonicotinoid pesticides on growing operations.

Policy statement here.

Cedarglen Floral Company1 location, OregonDoes not use neonicotinoids in spray form, as a soil drench, and does not buy seeds treated with these chemicals. Instead, uses beneficial insects and a balanced IPM approach to control pests. When the threshold approaches their documented level, they will use synthetic and natural pesticides which are OMRI listed, and which have a low impact on beneficial insects.

Policy statement here.

Creekside Garden Center1 location, MichiganNo nenoics in their plants.

Policy statement here.

Dancing Oaks Nursery and Gardens1 location, OregonDoes not use neonicotinoids.

Policy statement here.

Desert Canyon Farm1 location, ColoradoDoes not use neonicotinoids in any form and follows organic or OMRI methods.

Policy statement here.

Desert Jewels Nursery1 location, WashingtonNo pesticides.

Policy statement here.

Doak Creek Nursery1 location, OregonDoes not use herbicides or pesticides at nursery.

Policy statement here.

Draggin’ Wing Farm1 location, IdahoUses organic growing practices.

Policy statement here.

Earth First Native Plant Nursery and Gifts1 location, New JerseyNever uses chemical pesticides.

Policy statement here.

Ecoscapes Native Nursery1 location, MinnesotaDoesn’t use any insecticides, especially neonicotinoids.

Policy statement here.

EcoTulips1 location, Rhode IslandBelieves that pesticides don’t belong in gardens where children play and bees pollinate.

Policy statement here.

Edge of the Woods Native Plant Nursery1 location, PennsylvaniaDoes not use systemic pesticides—all plants are safe for visiting bees.

Policy statement here.

Edible Landscaping1 location, VirginiaUses no herbicides on plants.

Policy statement here.

Elmore Roots1 location, VermontCertified organic farm.

Policy statement here.

Found Well Farm1 location, New HampshireEverything grown in greenhouse is certified organic.

Policy statement here.

Hidden Savanna Nursery1 location, MichiganOnly uses organic pesticides, and only when severe pesticides occur.

Policy statement here.

High Country Gardens1 location, New MexicoAll perennials and wildflower seeds are neonicotinoid free.

Policy statement here.

Humble Roots Nursery1 location, OregonDoes not use harmful chemical or non-organic agents in growing of plants.

Policy statement here.

Inside Passage Seeds and Native Plant Services1 location, WashingtonProducts are locally-sourced native seeds. Inside Passage has been chemical-free since its opening in 1992.

Policy statement here.

Intermountain Nursery1 location, CaliforniaCommitted to providing plants that are grown in a sustainable way, without use of chemical fertilizers or pesticides.

Policy statement here.

Keystone Flora1 location, OhioPlants grown without the use of chemical fertilizers or pesticides.

Policy statement here.

Marin Ace Hardware1 location, CaliforniaAll plants are proudly neonic-free.

Policy statement here.

Middlebrook Gardens1 location, CaliforniaDoes not use any pre-treatment of neonicotinoids for growing and maintaining plants—simply use seed and water in soil.

Policy statement here.

Morning Sky Greenery1 location, MinnesotaUses IPM and does not rely on pesticides and herbicides.

Policy statement here.

Mountain Valley Growers1 location, CaliforniaBecame certified organic by the USDA in 2002.

Policy statement here.

Nashville Natives1 location, TennesseeHas never used synthetic insecticides and never will. Nashville Nurseries buys its seeds and starter plants from neonicotinoid-free nurseries.

Policy statement here.

Native Plant Nursery, Inc.1 location, MichiganUses no insecticides in the production of plant material.

Policy statement here.

Native Spring Nursery1 location, CaliforniaOnly uses organic pesticides when necessary.

Policy statement here.

North Creek Nurseries1 location, PennsylvaniaDoes not use neonicotinoids in any form.

Policy statement here.

O’Donnell’s Fairfax Nursery1 location, CaliforniaAn organic nursery.

Policy statement here.

Ohio Prairie Nursery1 location, OhioDoes not and will never use neonicotinoids.

Policy statement here.

Olympic Nursery, Inc. 1 location, Washington The farm and nursery are 100% herbicide and pesticide free.

Policy statement here.

Peace Tree Farm1 location, PennsylvaniaCertified organic grower, does not apply neonicotinoids in any form to any of their products.

Policy statement here.

Perennial Farm1 location,
Maryland
Does not use neonicotinoids in standard growing practice.

Policy statement here.

Pineland Nursery1 location, New JerseyPinelands Nursery is totally neonicotinoid free. This decision was made this Spring out of an abundance of caution.

Policy statement here.

Pine Ridge Gardens1 location, ArkansasDoes not use dangerous or systemic pesticides.

Policy statement here.

Plants for Pollinators1 location, TennesseeDoes not use insecticides or neonicotinoids on any of its products. Plants for Pollinators on purchase seeds from vendors who can verify and document that they do not use neonicotinoids.

Policy statement here.

The Plantsman Nursery1 location, New YorkSpray-free environment.

Policy statement here.

Prairie Nursery1 location, WisconsinDoes not use neonicotinoids in any part of the plant growing process.

Policy statement here.

Prairie Moon Nursery1 location, MinnesotaDoes not use neonicotinoids any form spray form, as a soil drench, and does not purchase seed from other growers who utilized neonicotinoids in their production.

Policy statement here.

Redbud Native Plant Nursery1 location, PennsylvaniaGrows native plants without the use of pesticides or herbicides.

Policy statement here.

Rolling River Nursery1 location, CaliforniaUSDA certified organic nursery.

Policy statement here.

Sandy’s Plants1 location, VirginiaWill stop using neonicotinoid products under moratorium in Europe and proposed to be banned in the Saving America’s Pollinators Act of 2013 (H.R. 2692) by the end of 2014. If use of one of those products is necessitated, Sandy’s Plants will label plants as a warning to consumers.

Policy statement here.

Simply Native Plant Nursery1 location, IllinoisNo neonicotinoids have ever been used.

Policy statement here.

Southeast Green Roofs1 location, TennesseeHas never used chemical insecticides and never will. Southeast Green Roofs’ nursery is 100% neonicotinoid-free, in addition to cuttings and plants for green roof propagation.

Policy statement here.

St. Lawrence Nurseries1 location, New YorkUses no conventional herbicides, fungicides, or pesticides.

Policy statement here.

Streambank Gardens1 location, DelawareOnly uses organically approved input products.

Policy statement here.

Suncrest Nurseries IncSupplier to California retail nurseries and garden centersWill stop using neonicotinoids altogether as of July 1, 2014.

Policy statement here.

The Tasteful Garden1 location, AlabamaCertified organic for everything that’s grown.

Policy statement here.

Tripple Brook Farm1 location, MassachusettsHave policy to not sell plants containing pesticides that harm bees and other pollinators, including neonicotinoids.

Policy statement here.

Vinland Valley Nursery1 location, KansasPlants are pesticide-free.

Policy statement here.

Walters Gardens, Inc.1 location, MichiganCommitted to eliminate neonicotinoids in 2014.

Policy statement here.

The Watershed Nursery1 location, Richmond, CANo neonicotinoids have ever been used on or nursery plants or anywhere else in the nursery and we commit to not ever using neonicotinoids in the future.

Policy statement here.

Westland Seed1 location, MontanaAll plants grown with OMRI certified organic fertilizers and pest controls.

Policy statement here.

Wichita Valley Nursery1 location, TexasUses organic pest controls.

Policy statement here.

Windmill Nursery, LLC1 location, Louisiana100 percent of plants grown are bee-friendly and neonicotinoid insecticide free.

Policy statement here.

Wits End Gardens1 location, IowaDoes not use neonicotinoids. Select starts from nurseries who also do not use them.

Policy statement here.

See Bee Safe Boulder’s list of Bee Safe Businesses in Colorado here.

See Northwest Center for Alternative to Pesticide’s list of neonic-free retailers and wholesalers in Oregon and Washington here.

Locate Beyond Pesticides’ Pollinator-Friendly Seed and Nursery Directory for resources on organic seeds and plants in your community here.

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